Family says more mental health resources needed for Sacramento homeless

Their loved ones try to hold on to the memory of Tanesha Dell, a Sacramento woman whose life was cut short after a horrific tragedy. Tanesha’s family told KCRA 3 that she was seriously injured in a hit-and-run accident in August, near the park. Freeway and Northgate Street in Sacramento. Doctors described her injuries as “catastrophic”. Watch the full story on KCRA 3 news at 11 p.m. “There was no brain activity. Her legs, hip, back, liver and lungs were all damaged beyond repair,” Tanisha’s sister, Gunisha Dunbar, said family members said Tanesha eventually died of her injuries on September 16 The devastation they felt after losing her had only now stabilized. “The pain is indescribable. We don’t know how to describe it. “We are just barely dealing with it,” Junisha said. Adding to the suffering, Tanisha’s family believes her death could have been avoided. They said Tanesha, a mother of three, was homeless at the time of the accident, and had been suffering from bipolar disorder and schizophrenia for more than a decade. Their loved ones said the mental health system had let Tanesha fall through the cracks. “That’s partly how we got here. We knew that one day we would have to answer questions or answer the phone call that would change our lives forever, and all we wanted was to get help at some point,” Junisha said, while Tanesha’s family said she got help at some point, They claimed there was little or no follow-up.” “The mental health system drops the ball,” said Tanesha’s mother Claudine Smith. “You drop the ball, and you cause so much harm, pain and death to our loved ones who suffer from these mental illnesses. And I think they should do more.” Sacramento County Homeless Mental Health Services KCRA 3 spoke to Sacramento County officials, who said when it comes to addressing mental health among the homeless population, they’re doing everything they can. But Monica Rocha-White, who oversees the Behavioral Health Initiatives in Homeless Sacramento County, said there are limitations.“It’s the client, or the person experiencing homelessness, in the end being their choice,” said Rocha White. They encourage people in need to seek resources. One avenue is the New Camp and Homeless Response Team, or HEART. Rocha-Wyatt said HEART meets with non-hosted people wherever they are, in order to connect them with the resources most appropriate for them. “We have the ability to rate them for our services and relate them to the level or The right services are there. On the field, then the best part about this team, is that they don’t stop there. They provide brief case management, to make sure they go to their first pickup appointment.” Out of care, but the county is following the whole process, according to Sacramento County Behavioral Health Director Rocha White Dr. Ryan Quest also said the department is ramping up its resources by transforming the adult outpatient system. They used to have three entry sites, but they are now expanding.” “We are now in the middle of implementing our new system of care, which is actually increasing the number of our sites to ten outpatient clinics,” Quest said. A few sites are already open, including one near American River opposite Discovery Park and one in the Natomas area.Quest said more are due to start operating soon, but Quest added that there are still challenges for his management—one of which is the workforce crisis.“We need more people to do this important work. We have over 100 medical job openings,” Quest said. Quest said that in order to provide a high level of care to those with mental health issues, they need more staff. Quest said they are active in hiring events, and they implemented a 16% increase in their compensation package to entice qualified people to apply for these jobs Establishes the Community Assistance, Recovery and Empowerment System – or CARE – Court in California The CARE Court Program will make it easier for families and first responders to compel mentally ill Californians to psychiatric treatment through court-ordered care. “They should allow the court order, so that mothers and sisters and daughters can go in there and say,” Claudine said, “My mother is too sick to be here on the street in this situation.” While there is some support for CAIR courts, the program has received Backlash from many human rights groups They claim interferes with free choice and may result in mental illness being stopped within state hospitals List of current and upcoming mental health visit sites in Sack County ramento.

Their loved ones try to hold on to the memory of Tanesha Dell, a Sacramento woman whose life ended after a horrific tragedy.

Tanisha’s family told KCRA 3 that it was. He was seriously injured in a hit-and-run accident in August, near Garden Highway and Northgate Boulevard in Sacramento. Doctors described her injuries as “catastrophic”.

  • Watch the full story on KCRA 3 news at 11pm

“There was no brain activity. Her legs, hip, back, liver and lungs were damaged beyond repair,” said Tanisha’s sister, Junisha Dunbar.

Family members said that Tanisha eventually died of her injuries on September 16. The devastation they felt after losing her only stabilized now.

“The pain is indescribable,” Junisha said. “We don’t know how to describe it. We hardly deal with it.”

A family calling for change

Adding to the suffering, Tanisha’s family believes her death could have been avoided. They said Tanesha, a mother of three, was homeless at the time of the accident, and had been suffering from bipolar disorder and schizophrenia for more than a decade.

Their loved ones said the mental health system had let Tanesha fall through the cracks.

“That’s partly how we got here,” Junisha said. “We knew that one day we would have to answer questions or answer the phone call that would change our lives forever, and all we wanted was help.”

While Tanesha’s family said she had help at one point, they claimed there was little or no follow-up.

“The mental health system drops the ball,” said Tanisha’s mother, Claudine Smith. “You drop the ball, and you are causing so much harm, pain and death to our loved ones who suffer from these mental illnesses. And I think they should do more.”

Sacramento County Homeless Mental Health Services

KCRA 3 spoke to Sacramento County officials, who said when it comes to addressing mental health among the homeless population, they are doing their best. But Monica Rocha-White, who oversees behavioral health initiatives in non-dwelling Sacramento County, said there are limitations.

“It’s the client, or the person experiencing homelessness, it’s ultimately their choice,” said Rocha White.

However, Rocha White said that as director of the health program for the Sacramento County Department of Health Services, she encourages people in need to seek resources. One avenue is the Camp and New Homeless Response Team, or HEART. Rocha-Wyatt said HEART is meeting non-residential people wherever they are, in order to connect them to the resources most appropriate for them.

“We have the ability to evaluate them for our services and correlate them with the appropriate level or services that are in the field, so the best part about this team is that they don’t stop there. They provide brief case management, to make sure they go to their first pickup appointment,” said Rocha White.

The caregiver takes over the chain of care, but the county follows the entire process, according to Rocha White.

Sacramento County Behavioral Health Director Dr. Ryan Quest also said the department is ramping up its resources by transforming the adult outpatient system. They used to have three entry sites, but they are currently expanding.

“We are now in the middle of implementing our new system of care, which is effectively increasing the number of our sites to ten outpatient clinics,” Quest said.

A few locations have already opened, including one near the American River across from Discovery Park and one in the Natomas area. Quest said more are set to start running soon.

But Quest added that there are still challenges facing his administration – one of which is the workforce crisis.

“We need more people to do this important work,” Quest said. “We have more than 100 medical job openings.”

Quest said that in order to provide a high level of care to those with mental health issues, they need more staff. Quist said they are active in hiring events, and implemented a 16% increase in their compensation package to entice qualified people to apply for these jobs.

CARE Court legislation signed into law

Some families, including the Tanesha family, also support new legislation that establishes Community Assistance, Recovery and Empowerment — or CARE — the California court system. The CARE Court program will make it easier for families and first responders to force mentally ill Californians into psychiatric treatment through court-ordered care.

“They should allow the court order, so that mothers and sisters and daughters can go in there and say, ‘My mother is too sick to be here on the street in this condition,'” Claudine said.

While there is some support for CARE’s courts, the program has received a backlash from many human rights groups. They claim that it interferes with people’s freedom of choice and could lead to the internment of mentally ill people inside state hospitals.

Links to resources

click over here For more information from the Sacramento County Department of Health Services about the Homeless Response and Response Team (HEART).

click over here For a list of current and upcoming mental health visit sites in Sacramento County.

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